Blog

Tech roundup 44: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

Gooooooood morning, Masses!!! Hey, this is not a test, this is a tech roundup. Time to rock it from the Delta to the DMZ.

AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

  • VPN⁰: A Privacy-Preserving Distributed VPN
    Distributed virtual private networks (dVPNs) are a new form of VPN with no central authority. In a dVPN, users are both VPN clients and relay/exit nodes as in a Peer-to-Peer (P2P) network. While dVPNs make strong privacy claims, they also carry the risk that a user will inadvertently have their machine used to transmit potentially harmful or illegal network traffic. Several incidents have been reported [2] where unaware dVPN users have been (ab)used as exit nodes.
  • Mac software distributed outside the Mac App Store must be notarized by Apple
    As a reminder, Mac software distributed outside the Mac App Store must be notarized by Apple in order to run on macOS Catalina. To make this transition easier and to protect users on macOS Catalina who continue to use older versions of software, we’ve adjusted the notarization prerequisites until January 2020.
  • Scribe: Transporting petabytes per hour via a distributed, buffered queueing
  • IRS issues additional guidance on tax treatment for cryptocurrency
    IR-2019-167, October 9, 2019

    WASHINGTON — As part of a wider effort to assist taxpayers and to enforce the tax laws in a rapidly changing area, the Internal Revenue Service today issued two new pieces of guidance for taxpayers who engage in transactions involving virtual currency.

Woman computer scientist of the week
Jeannette Marie Wing is Avanessians Director of the Data Sciences Institute at Columbia University, where she is also a professor of computer science. Until June 30, 2017, she was Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Research with oversight of its core research laboratories around the world and Microsoft Research Connections. Prior to 2013, she was the President’s Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. She also served as assistant director for Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the NSF from 2007 to 2010.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

OAuth is the best that the wrong way of doing things can provide.

        — Mike Stay

Enterprises

Other news

Suscríbete al blog por correo electrónico

Introduce tu correo electrónico para suscribirte a este blog y recibir avisos de nuevas entradas.

Tech roundup 43: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

Gooooooood morning, Information superhighway!!! Hey, this is not a test, this is a tech roundup. Time to rock it from the Delta to the DMZ.

AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Fatimata Seye Sylla is the director of Senegal’s Digital Freedom Initiative, a council member for the Free and Open Source Software Foundation for Africa, and the Senegal National Coordinator of the African Civil Society for the Information Society. She is a former member of the At-Large Advisory Committee for ICANN, where she represented Senegal, and advocated there for greater involvement of the developing world with Internet governance. She also served on the board of the CATIA initiative, a program that worked to support ICT initiatives and their directors across African countries.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

Languages that try to disallow idiocy become themselves idiotic.

        — Rob Pike

Enterprises

Other news

Suscríbete al blog por correo electrónico

Introduce tu correo electrónico para suscribirte a este blog y recibir avisos de nuevas entradas.

Tech roundup 42: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

Gooooooood morning, Human beings!!! Hey, this is not a test, this is a tech roundup. Time to rock it from the Delta to the DMZ.

AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Margaret Heafield Hamilton is an American computer scientist, systems engineer, and business owner. She is credited with coining the term “software engineering”. Hamilton was Director of the Software Engineering Division of the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory, which developed on-board flight software for the Apollo space program. In 1986, she became the founder and CEO of Hamilton Technologies, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The company was developed around the Universal Systems Language based on her paradigm of Development Before the Fact (DBTF) for systems and software design.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

You’re bound to be unhappy if you optimize everything.

        — Donald Knuth

Enterprises

Other news

Suscríbete al blog por correo electrónico

Introduce tu correo electrónico para suscribirte a este blog y recibir avisos de nuevas entradas.

Tech roundup 41: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

Gooooooood morning, Public!!! Hey, this is not a test, this is a tech roundup. Time to rock it from the Delta to the DMZ.

AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Radhika Nagpal is an American computer scientist and researcher in the fields of self-organising computer systems, biologically-inspired robotics, and biological multi-agent systems. She is the Fred Kavli Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University and the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. She is also a Core Faculty Member of the Harvard Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. In 2017, Nagpal co-founded a robotics company under the name of Root Robotics. This educational company works to create many different opportunities for those unable to code to learn how.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

We have persistant(sic) objects, they’re called files.

        — Ken Thompson

Enterprises

Other news

Suscríbete al blog por correo electrónico

Introduce tu correo electrónico para suscribirte a este blog y recibir avisos de nuevas entradas.

El nivel de acceso Archive en Azure

En las cuentas de Storage en Azure, disponemos de varios elementos de configuración que influyen directamente en la disponibilidad de la información que vamos a almacenar, el precio de tenerlo guardado, el de acceder a los datos y la latencia que tendremos hasta poder leer el primer byte de información. Entre esos elementos está el propio tipo de cuenta y el nivel de rendimiento, así como el tipo de replicación. Para simplificar todo y no desviarnos del objetivo de este artículo, nos centraremos en las cuentas de tipo propósito general V2 (StorageV2) con nivel de rendimiento estándar y replicación LRS (Locally-redundant storage). De este modo nos podremos centrar en el elemento que nos interesa explicar hoy: el nivel de acceso.

Nivel de acceso Azure

Seguir leyendo en CompartiMOSS.

Tech roundup 40: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

Gooooooood morning, W3!!! Hey, this is not a test, this is a tech roundup. Time to rock it from the Delta to the DMZ.

AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Stephanie Seneff is a senior research scientist at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Working primarily in the Spoken Language Systems group, her research at CSAIL relates to human-computer interaction, and algorithms for language understanding and speech recognition. In 2011, she began publishing controversial papers in low-impact, open access journals on biology and medical topics; the articles have received “heated objections from experts in almost every field she’s delved into,” according to columnist Ari LeVaux.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

i’ve wondered whether Linux sysfs should be called syphilis

        — forsyth

Enterprises

Other news

Suscríbete al blog por correo electrónico

Introduce tu correo electrónico para suscribirte a este blog y recibir avisos de nuevas entradas.

Tech roundup 39: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

Gooooooood morning, Humans!!! Hey, this is not a test, this is a tech roundup. Time to rock it from the Delta to the DMZ.

AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Leslie Pack Kaelbling is an American roboticist and the Panasonic Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is widely recognized for adapting partially observable Markov decision process from operations research for application in artificial intelligence and robotics. Kaelbling received the IJCAI Computers and Thought Award in 1997 for applying reinforcement learning to embedded control systems and developing programming tools for robot navigation. In 2000, she was elected as a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

Software gets slower faster than hardware gets faster.

        — Wirth’s law

Enterprises

Other news

Suscríbete al blog por correo electrónico

Introduce tu correo electrónico para suscribirte a este blog y recibir avisos de nuevas entradas.