Tech roundup 19: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Dana Ulery is an American computer scientist and pioneer in scientific computing applications. She began her career in 1961 as the first woman engineer at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, designing and developing algorithms to model NASA’s Deep Space Network capabilities and automating real-time tracking systems for the Ranger and Mariner space missions using a North American Aviation Recomp II, 40-bit word size computer. Over the course of her career, she has held positions as an applied science and technology researcher and manager in industry, academia, and government. In 2007, she retired from her position as Chief Scientist of the Computational and Information Sciences Directorate at the United States Army Research Laboratory(ARL).

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

The central enemy of reliability is complexity.

        — Geer et al.

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Tech roundup 18: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Marti Hearst is a professor in the School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley. She did early work in corpus-based computational linguistics, including some of the first work in automating sentiment analysis, and word sense disambiguation. She invented an algorithm that became known as “Hearst patterns” which applies lexico-syntactic patterns to recognize hyponymy (ISA) relations with high accuracy in large text collections, including an early application of it to WordNet; this algorithm is widely used in commercial text mining applications including ontology learning. Hearst also developed early work in automatic segmentation of text into topical discourse boundaries, inventing a now well-known approach called TextTiling.

Cloud and architecture

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Quote of the week

Life is too short to run proprietary software.

        — Bdale Garbee

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Tech roundup 17: a journal published by a bot

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Amy Ashurst Gooch is a computer scientist known for her contributions in non-photorealistic rendering. She is currently the Chief Operations Officer at ViSUS LLC, a data visualization research spin-off software company from the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute. She is also an adjunct professor of computer science at Texas A&M University. Her current research is part of an interdisciplinary effort involving computer graphics, perceptual psychology, and computational vision. She is interested in better understanding the spatial information potentially available in CG imagery, determining what spatial cues are actually used when CG imagery is viewed, and using this information to create improved rendering algorithms and visualizations.

Cloud and architecture

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Quote of the week

Software sucks because users demand it to.

        — Nathan Myhrvold

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Tech roundup 16: a journal published by a bot

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Paula Bonta is an Argentinian/Canadian computer scientist and educational software designer. She is known for developing programming environments for children, most notably contributing to the design of the Scratch programming language before it was even called Scratch. She co-founded the Playful Invention Company, a spin-off from the MIT Media Lab noted for developing the Programmable Cricket, with Mitchel Resnick and Brian Silverman and serves as Lead Designer. She was also the design director for several award-winning software products for children, including MicroWorlds and the “My Make Believe” series of products from Logo Computer Systems, Inc. She has a degree in computer science and a graduate degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

What I cannot build, I do not understand.

        — Richard Feynman

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Tech roundup 15: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Mary K. Hawes was a computer scientist who identified the need for a common business language in accounting, which led to the development of COBOL. Hawes chaired the data descriptions subcommittee in the Short-Range Committee, the team that was initially tasked with identifying problems with the current business compilers. In 1959, Hawes was a senior product planning analyst for the Electro Data Division of Burroughs Corporation. Mary K. Hawes co-authored the books Optimized code generation from extended-entry decision tables published in September 1971, Feature analysis of generalized data base management systems: CODASYL Systems Committee published in May 1971, and A survey of generalized data base management systems published in May 1969.

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Quote of the week

Code never lies, comments sometimes do.

        — Ron Jeffries

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Tech roundup 14: a journal published by a bot

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Mary Allen Wilkes is a former computer programmer and logic designer, most known for her work with the LINC computer, now recognized by many as the world’s first “personal computer.” Wilkes graduated from Wellesley College in 1959 where she majored in philosophy and theology. At that time she wanted to become a lawyer but was discouraged by friends and mentors because she was a woman. She sought work in the computer field partly because computer programming was a field that was open to women and partly because her geography teacher in the eighth grade had told her during a class discussion, “Mary Allen, when you grow up, you ought to be a computer programmer.” She had no idea at the time what that meant, but she never forgot it. She finally became an attorney in 1975.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

IDE features are language smells.

        — Reg Braithwaite

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Tech roundup 13: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
The Nibiru cataclysm is a supposed disastrous encounter between the Earth and a large planetary object which certain groups believe will take place in the early 21st century. Believers in this doomsday event usually refer to this object as Nibiru or Planet X. The idea was first put forward in 1995 by Nancy Lieder, founder of the website ZetaTalk. Lieder describes herself as a contactee with the ability to receive messages from extraterrestrials from the Zeta Reticuli star system through an implant in her brain. She states that she was chosen to warn mankind that the object would sweep through the inner Solar System in May 2003 causing Earth to undergo a physical pole shift that would destroy most of humanity.

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Quote of the week

cat came back from Berkeley waving flags

        — Rob Pike

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