Tech roundup 37: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Janice Richmond “Jan” Lourie is a computer scientist and graphic artist. In the late 1960s she was a pioneer in CAD/CAM for the textile industry. She is best known for inventing a set of software tools that facilitate the textile production stream from artist to manufacturer. For the Graphical Design Of Textiles process she was granted IBM’s first software patent. Other projects, in differing disciplines, share the focus on graphic representation. She returns throughout an ongoing career to the stacked two-dimensional tabular arrays of textiles and computer graphics, and the topological structures of interrelated data.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

A data structure is just a stupid programming language.

        — R. Wm. Gosper

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Tech roundup 36: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

Gooooooood morning, Human race!!! Hey, this is not a test, this is a tech roundup. Time to rock it from the Delta to the DMZ.

AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week

Allison Randal is a software developer and author. She was the chief architect of the Parrot virtual machine, a member of the board of directors for The Perl Foundation, a Director of the Python Software Foundation from 2010 to 2012, and the Chairman of the Parrot Foundation. She is also the lead developer of Punie, the port of Perl 1 to Parrot. She is co-author of Perl 6 and Parrot Essentials and the Synopses of Perl 6. She was employed by O’Reilly Media. From August 2010 till February 2012, Randal was the Technical Architect of Ubuntu at Canonical.

Cloud and architecture

  • Patterns on goods designed to trigger Automated License Plate Readers
    Clothing and tutorials for confounding and triggering computer vision-based surveillance systems with fashion and accessories.
  • Architecting Containers: Why Understanding User Space vs. Kernel Space Matters
    Perhaps you’ve been charged with developing a container-based application infrastructure?  If so, you most likely understand the value that containers can provide to your developers, architects, and operations team. In fact, you’ve likely been reading up on containers and are excited about exploring the technology in more detail. However, before diving head-first into a discussion about the architecture and deployment of containers in a production environment, there are three important things that developers, architects, and systems administrators, need to know:All applications, inclusive of containerized applications, rely on the underlying kernelThe kernel provides an API to these applications via system callsVersioning of this API matters as it’s the “glue” that ensures deterministic communication between the user space and kernel spaceWhile containers are sometimes treated like virtual machines, it is important to note, unlike virtual machines, the kernel is the only layer of abstraction between programs and the resources they need access to. Let’s see why.All processes make system calls:] As containers are processes, they also make system calls:]OK, so you understand what a process is, and that containers are processes, but what about the files and programs that live inside a container image? These files and programs make up what is known as user space. When a container is started, a program is loaded into memory from the container image. Once the program in the container is running, it still needs to make system calls into kernel space. The ability for the user space and kernel space to communicate in a deterministic fashion is critical.User SpaceUser space refers to all of the code in an operating system that lives outside of the kernel. Most Unix-like operating systems (including Linux) come pre-packaged with all kinds of utilities, programming languages, and graphical tools – these are user space applications. We often refer to this as “userland.”…
  • Monads as a Programming Pattern
    This article is written from a programmer’s perspective, where a monad is a software engineering pattern. It’s just another tool for your box.
  • The Capital One breach proved we must rethink cloud security
  • Laws of Locality: Where in your UI you should put certain controls
  • How Far Out Is AWS Fargate?
  • Making Cloud.typography Faster
  • Microsoft Screws Azure Customers and Its Own Advocates Alike
    Microsoft’s recent licensing change for Windows Server is a great modern-day example of why so many businesses hated Microsoft two decades ago. Is this an aberration, or are they back to their old tricks?
  • The Sinister Brutality of Shipping Container Architecture
  • Cloudflare S-1
  • Apple files lawsuit against Corellium for iOS emulation
  • Prophecy.io – Cloud Native Data Engineering

Development and languages

Quote of the week

With diligence it is possible to make anything run slowly.

— Tom Duff

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Tech roundup 35: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Maria Zemankova is a Computer Scientist who is known for the theory and implementation of the first Fuzzy Relational Database System. This research has become important for the handling of approximate queries in databases. She is currently a Program Officer in the Intelligent Information Systems Division at the National Science Foundation. She is the first (1992) recipient of the SIGMOD Contributions Award for her work in the conception of initiatives in research on scientific databases and digital libraries. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1983 from Florida State University for her work on Fuzzy Relational Database Systems.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

If you want to go somewhere, goto is the best way to get there.

        — ken

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Tech roundup 34: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Hava Siegelmann is a professor of computer science, and a world leader in the fields of Lifelong Learning, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Neural Networks, and Computational Neuroscience. Her academic position is in the school of Computer Science and the Program of Neuroscience and Behavior at the University of Massachusetts Amherst; she is the director of the school’s Biologically Inspired Neural and Dynamical Systems Lab. She joined DARPA in July, 2016 and is the Program Manager for the Lifelong Learning Machine (L2M) program.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

Object-oriented design is the roman numerals of computing.

        — Rob Pike

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Tech roundup 33: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

  • A Practitioner’s Guide to Deep Learning with Ludwig
  • A Worrying Analysis of Recent Neural Recommendation Approaches
    Deep learning techniques have become the method of choice for researchers
    working on algorithmic aspects of recommender systems. With the strongly
    increased interest in machine learning in general, it has, as a result, become
    difficult to keep track of what represents the state-of-the-art at the moment,
    e.g., for top-n recommendation tasks. At the same time, several recent
    publications point out problems in today’s research practice in applied machine
    learning, e.g., in terms of the reproducibility of the results or the choice of
    the baselines when proposing new models. In this work, we report the results of
    a systematic analysis of algorithmic proposals for top-n recommendation tasks.
    Specifically, we considered 18 algorithms that were presented at top-level
    research conferences in the last years. Only 7 of them could be reproduced with
    reasonable effort. For these methods, it however turned out that 6 of them can
    often be outperformed with comparably simple heuristic methods, e.g., based on
    nearest-neighbor or graph-based techniques. The remaining one clearly
    outperformed the baselines but did not consistently outperform a well-tuned
    non-neural linear ranking method. Overall, our work sheds light on a number of
    potential problems in today’s machine learning scholarship and calls for
    improved scientific practices in this area. Source code of our experiments and
    full results are available at:
    https://github.com/MaurizioFD/RecSys2019_DeepLearning_Evaluation.
  • The AI of GoldenEye 007
  • Deciphering Linear B with AI
    In this paper we propose a novel neural approach for automatic decipherment
    of lost languages. To compensate for the lack of strong supervision signal, our
    model design is informed by patterns in language change documented in
    historical linguistics. The model utilizes an expressive sequence-to-sequence
    model to capture character-level correspondences between cognates. To
    effectively train the model in an unsupervised manner, we innovate the training
    procedure by formalizing it as a minimum-cost flow problem. When applied to the
    decipherment of Ugaritic, we achieve a 5.5% absolute improvement over
    state-of-the-art results. We also report the first automatic results in
    deciphering Linear B, a syllabic language related to ancient Greek, where our
    model correctly translates 67.3% of cognates.
  • AI Portraits
  • AI is supercharging the creation of maps around the world
    Map With AI, tool created by Facebook researchers and engineers, is helping the OpenStreetMap (OSM) project map missing roads around the world.
  • Simple trading bot in JavaScript using ~40 lines of code
  • An Introduction to Recurrent Neural Networks
  • Waifu Labs – AI Generated Custom Waifus
  • Play rock paper and scissors against a untrained neural network
  • Darpa’s New Brain Device Increases Learning Speed by 40%

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Ashawna Hailey, created the HSPICE program which large parts of the worldwide semiconductor industry use to simulate and design silicon chips. Her company, Meta-Software, produced compound annual growth rate in excess of 25-30 percent every year for 18 years, and eventually became part of Synopsys, which calls HSPICE “the ‘gold standard’ for accurate circuit simulation”. In 1973 she created Advanced Micro Devices’ first microprocessor, the Am9080, a clone of the Intel 8080, and in 1974, AMD’s first nonvolatile memory, the 2702 2048-bit EPROM. Earlier, she built the launch sequencer for the Sprint Anti-Ballistic Missile System for Martin Marietta.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

RMS is to Unix, like Hitler [was] to Nietzsche.

        — Federico Benavento

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Tech roundup 32: a journal published by a bot

Read a tech roundup with this week’s news that our powerful bot has chosen: blockchain, AI, development, corporates and more.

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AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Margaret Kampschaefer Butler was a longtime mathematician who participated in creating and updating computer software. During the early 1950s, Butler contributed to the development of early computers. Butler was the first female fellow at the American Nuclear Society and director of the National Energy Software Center at Argonne. Butler held leadership positions within multiple scientific organizations and women’s groups. She was the creator and director of the National Energy Software Center. Here, Butler operated an exchange for the editing of computer programs in regards to nuclear power and developed early principles for computer technology.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

A good way to have good ideas is by being unoriginal.

        — Bram Cohen

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Tech roundup 31: a journal published by a bot

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Gooooooood morning, World!!! Hey, this is not a test, this is a tech roundup. Time to rock it from the Delta to the DMZ.

AI, bots and robots

Blockchain and decentralization

Woman computer scientist of the week
Maja J. Mataric is an American computer scientist and roboticist, and the Chan Soon-Shiong Chaired Professor of Computer Science, Neuroscience, and Pediatrics at the University of Southern California. She is known for her work in human-robot interaction for socially assistive robotics, a new field she pioneered, which focuses on creating robots capable of providing personalized therapy and care through social rather than physical interaction, through technologies aimed at aiding special needs populations including the elderly, stroke patients, and children with autism. She is also known for her earlier work on coordination of robot teams and robot navigation.

Cloud and architecture

Development and languages

Quote of the week

The unavoidable price of reliability is simplicity.

        — C.A.R. Hoare

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